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Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

2 edition of Productivity growth in Canadian telecommunications found in the catalog.

Productivity growth in Canadian telecommunications

Melvyn A. Fuss

Productivity growth in Canadian telecommunications

by Melvyn A. Fuss

  • 136 Want to read
  • 18 Currently reading

Published by Dept. of Economics and Institute for Policy Analysis, University of Toronto in Toronto .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Telecommunication -- Canada -- Labor productivity.,
  • Productivity -- Canada.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 18-20).

    Statementby Melvyn A. Fuss.
    SeriesWorking paper series / Dept. of Economics and Institute for Policy Analysis, University of Toronto -- no. 9214, Working paper series (University of Toronto. Institute for Policy Analysis) -- no. 9214.
    ContributionsUniversity of Toronto. Institute for Policy Analysis.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHE7814 .F788 1992
    The Physical Object
    Pagination32 p. ;
    Number of Pages32
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14787949M

    Telecommunications and economic growth: A panel data approach. Applied Economics. v Google Scholar; Denny, Fuss, & Waverman (). The measurement and interpretation of total factor productivity in regulated industries, with an application to Canadian : LamPun-Lee, ShiuAlice. There is evidence that relatively lower productivity in Canada is created by relatively lower competitive intensity. Increasing competitive intensity by removing or reducing sector regimes would have an immediate and substantial impact on innovation.

    The broadcasting and telecommunications industry had similar productivity growth in the two countries before , and after it had much slower productivity growth in Canada. The airline industry and the publishing and information services industries had slower productivity growth in Canada than in the United States over the to Determinants of Canadian productivity growth: Issues and prospects (Discussion paper) [Harris, Richard G] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Determinants of Canadian productivity growth: Issues and prospects (Discussion paper)Author: Richard G Harris.

      Productivity – the amount produced per hour of work – is one of the main drivers of economic growth, especially in an aging society such as Canada’s. Yet Canada invests less in research and development (R&D) than a number of other similar countries do. This lack of investment may be a critical problem given that R&D can spark innovations that generally lead to higher productivity. This paper examines the impact of information communication technology (ICT), human capital, and human resource management on labour productivity growth in the Canadian tourism/hospitality industries using the Canadian Workplace and Employee Survey from to Feasible generalized least squares and generalized method of moments estimations are Cited by: 7.


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Productivity growth in Canadian telecommunications by Melvyn A. Fuss Download PDF EPUB FB2

Productivity growth in Canadian telecommunications M E L V Y N A. F U S S University of Toronto Abstract. Canadian telecommunications firms do not price proportionately to marginal cost. The prices of toll services tend to be above marginal costs, whereas the prices of basic local services are typically set below marginal costs by regulators.

Canadian telecommunications firms do not price proportionately to marginal cost. The prices of toll services tend to be above marginal costs, whereas the prices of basic local services are typically set below marginal costs by regulators.

However, between the to and - to periods, annua- labour productivity l growth in the industry slowed from % to %. As well, productivity growth in broadcasting and Canadian telecommunications has been low compared with the United States (Baldwin and Gu, ). Sincethe industry has been one.

Recent work on regional or interspatial productivity measures has improved our capabilities of interpreting relation productivity levels across firms. 1 In an earlier paper, we reported some preliminary results of applying these methods to three large Canadian telecommunications firms.

2 These firms are relatively unique because they have all Cited by: 1. Productivity Growth in Canadian Telecommunications. By Melvyn A. Fuss. Abstract. Canadian telecommunications firms do not price proportionately to marginal cost.

The prices of toll services tend to be above marginal costs, whereas the prices of basic local services are typically set below marginal costs by regulators. the conventional Author: Melvyn A. Fuss. But Canadian growth exceeded that of the United States up to the early s. Since then, U.S.

labour productivity growth has exceeded Canadian growth. The. The emergence and Productivity growth in Canadian telecommunications book of the interconnect industry in Canada reflects two regulatory decisions by the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), that allowed consumer control of access to the public switched telephone network.

In. Labour Productivity Growth % % ICT Contribution to Labour Productivity % % As Table E-1 shows, research indicates that Canada fell behind the U.S.

in the adoption of ICT in the last five years of the 20th century. Labour productivity growth and the contribution of ICT to labour productivity have been lower in Canada than in the U.S.

The productivity increase in the second quarter was mainly attributable to goods-producing businesses ( percent) while in service-producing business declined percent.

Productivity in Canada averaged Index Points from untilreaching an all time high of Index Points in the second quarter. increases in the rate of aggregate productivity growth after deregulation. Since we have plant-level data we can introduce indices which delve deeper into how this productivity growth occurred.

These indices indicate that productivity increases were primarily a result of a reallocation of capital towards more productive establishments. This paper compares the productivity growth of a set of Canadian and U.S.

regulated industries. Using data from Statistics Canada's KLEMS database and the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, the. Denny, M., M. Fuss, and L. Waverman. “The Measurement and Interpretation of Total Factor Productivity in Regulated Industries, with an Application to Canadian Telecommunications.”In Productivity Measurement in Regulated Industries, edited by T.

Cowing and R. Stevenson. New York: Academic by: Downloadable (with restrictions). Labour productivity growth in the Canadian business sector slowed substantially after Most of the slowdown occurred in the manufacturing sector. This paper examines how this slowdown was associated with the restructuring that occurred in manufacturing as a result of the increase in excess capacity, the dramatic increase in the.

Since the early s, there has been a growing interest in measuring the productivity and efficiency of the telecommunications sector.

In the early period, the focus was on measuring total factor productivity (TFP) growth, which is the growth in output not accounted for by the growth in by: 1. CSLS Research Reports on Productivity.

“Human Capital and Productivity in British Columbia,” (Mb) (August ) Report number: A press release is available for this report. Download the database for this paper here: BC Human Capital Database “A Detailed Analysis of the Productivity Performance of Canadian Food Manufacturing ” (Mb) (August.

Low productivity jobs continue to drive employment growth: Labour productivity growth GDP per hour worked, percentage rate at annual rate. 29/04/ - Employment is rising in OECD countries but most jobs continue to be created in relatively low-productivity, low-wage activities, says a new OECD report.

Sincelabour productivity growth in the Canadian economy has been weak. Yet increased productivity growth is by far the most important determinant or driver of increased material living standards for Canadians. It is also the most important means by. Productivity Accounting: The Economics of Business Performance offers an in-depth analysis of variation in business performance, providing the reader with an analytical framework within which to account for this variation and its causes and by: This study examines the dynamics of the rapid productivity growth that occurred in the Canadian broadcasting and telecommunications industry since the mids.

Growth within firms was the main contributor to aggregate productivity growth. Both technical progress and scale economies contributed to aggregate productivity growth. Denney, M., M.

Fuss, and L. Waverman () “The Measurement and Interpretation of Total Factor Productivity in Regulated Industries with Applications in Canadian Telecommunications,” in T. Cowing and R. Stevenson, eds., Productivity Measurement in Regulated Industries (New York: Academic Press)Author: Subhash C.

Ray. Canada's economic growth will slow in the years ahead as a result of the country's aging population. One critical way to offset the impact of aging demographics is through faster productivity growth, supported by enhanced innovation.

But Canada's track record on .Information Technology and Productivity Growth: 3 Evidence from Canadian Industries Wulong Gu & Weimin Wang Abstract ABOUR PRODUCTIVITY GROWTH ACCELERATED in the Canadian business sector after Our analysis shows that the rise in multi-factor productivity (MFP) growth was the main contributing factor.

Information technologies (IT).productivity growth in Canada. • Whether the recent surge in U.S. productivity will be replicated in Canada is a critical issue for the future.

While there is uncertainty about future rates of Canadian productivity growth, it is reasonable to expect some increase in trend growth relative to the rates of recent decades.